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Confessions of a Reading Teacher

Yes- reading is immensely important for many reasons. Obviously the more a person reads, the more well-rounded and diverse in knowledge he/she becomes. So for this reason, I should read more. Note the word "should."

My friend has a secret love affair with book; and while I don't think that is necessarily healthy either, the fact that she is constantly expanding her knowledge base and developing her vocabulary bank of new words is impressive. She spouts titles and authors as if she is asking you to pass the salt at the lunch table. I aspire to be like her.

But I am not . Nor will I (most likely) ever be. You see- as my true confession of a reading teacher I should probably let you in on my dirty little secret- I hate to read looooong novels. (GASP!-- I know)
Don't get me wrong. I love reading, as much as the next girl; however, try as I might to read the popular titles and well-known authors, I find that I prefer online articles, periodicals, and informational text. Give me a fiction book and I MIGHT attempt to read it, but only out of guilt and peer pressure.

So fast-forward to a few days ago. Several friends and I were having a conversation about books and what they have been reading lately. I listened and upon being asked if I wanted to borrow one of the titles, replied, "No... That's ok. I probably won't end up reading it. I don't really read much." It was as if time stood still with that comment. A reading teacher who doesn't read..... what kind of school is this, anyway?!?

Going home feeling like a failure at my craft, I began thinking about how I spend my time each night and quickly realized- I actually DO read. I read a lot, actually. I feel giddy when I get my monthly subscription of Teach&Learn. I enjoy the new articles from Eduptopia.com. I frequently browse PLN Network and also spend several nights a week with some people I have never met face to face but log in regularly to see and share innovative ideas and inspiration and motivation using various PLN groups on Twitter Chat. I recently read If You Can't Fail, It Doesn't Count (by Dave Guymon) and Teach Like a Pirate (by Dave Burgess; @daveburgess). {Sidenote: Dave must be 1.) an awesomely popular name or 2.) I secretly wish I had named my first born Dave..... I will go with #1.)

So, while it may not be the latest cool novel; and I often need reminders of popular authors when visiting with my book-loving friend- I can hold my head up high and not feel like such a loser because at the end of the night- I am a reader...afterall!

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